Wine Review: Three 2013 Alsatian Pinot Blancs… Or Should I Say One and a Half?

Disclaimer: this review is of samples that I received from the producers’ US PR agency. My review has been conducted in compliance with my Samples Policy and the ISA wine tasting protocol and the opinions I am going to share on the wines are my own.

AOC AlsaceWhen I got an email asking whether I would review samples of three Pinot Blancs from France’s Alsace region, I wholeheartedly accepted because I generally very much like Alsatian Rieslings and Gewürztraminers, but I was not familiar with their Pinot Blancs so it sounded like a great opportunity to make myself an idea. Plus, Pinot Blanc is not a grape that you often see in varietal (as in, 100% Pinot Blanc) wines: it is more often used as a blending partner of other grapes, including in the context of the blend of certain French or Italian Classic Method sparkling wines together with Chardonnay or Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir.

So, let’s get to it and let me tell you how I liked them.

About the Grape(s)

Well, before we even start talking about Pinot Blanc, let me just reiterate something that I mentioned on my previous post about the Alsace AOC appellation.

Although the rules of the Alsace AOC appellation require that, if a variety is indicated on the label, the wine must be entirely made out of grapes from that variety (which is all good), this is actually not true for Pinot Blanc wines. More specifically, Alsace AOC rules permit that a wine labeled “Pinot Blanc be either a blend of, or even made entirely out of, any of the following varietiesPinot BlancAuxerrois (which is a separate variety that is often confused with Pinot Blanc), Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir (vinified white, as in the Champagne region). In other words, under Alsace AOC rules, a wine that is made out of 100% Pinot Gris grapes may legally be labeled and sold as “Pinot Blanc”(!)

Now, this kind of bothers me: I mean, how would you like it if you went out to buy a Toyota and they sold you a Nissan that is however branded as a Toyota? Nothing wrong in my book with either a Toyota or a Nissan, but one should be able to get what they went out to buy, right?

Anyway, two out of the three wines that I reviewed were exactly in the situation described above (for details, see below in the individual descriptions). One of the wines was a truly varietal Pinot Blanc, the second wine was a blend of Auxerrois and Pinot Blanc, and the third one was a blend of Auxerrois, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir. So, the first wine was 100% Pinot Blanc, while the Pinot Blanc component in the blends of the second and third wines combined was just 50%, hence the title of this post.

For information and cool facts about all the varieties that were used for making those three wines, please refer to my previous post about the Alsace AOC appellation or click on any of the grape variety links above which will redirect you to the relevant entry in our Grape Variety Archive.

About the Appellation and the Alsace Region

For an overview of the Alsace AOC appellation and the Alsace wine region, its terroir and main grape varieties, please refer to my previous post.

About the Reviewed Wines and Their Producers

Here below are my reviews of the three wines that I tasted, as well as some high-level information about their producers. It is interesting to note how the second and the third wines were similar in style, while the first one had a style of its own.

As always, for my reviews I will use a simplified version of the ISA wine tasting protocol that we described in a previous post: should you have doubts as to any of the terms used below please refer to that post for a refresher. For your own structured wine tastings, consider downloading our FsT Wine Tasting Chart!

(Explanation of our Rating and Pricing Systems)

My Overall Opinion: In a nutshell, to me there was a clear winner among the three 2013 Pinot Blancs that I tasted in this mini-horizontal tasting exercise, and that was the Meyer-Fonné Vieilles Vignes Pinot Blanc. It was the wine that delivered the most complete package among the three, with a nice nose and a very pleasant, interesting mouth, and it was the most balanced of the three, with its smoothness being effectively countered by intense minerality and tastiness. Then Domaines Schlumberger’s “Les Princes Abbés snatched second place, with a wine whose pleasant mouthfeel was penalized by its timid and narrow nose. Albert Mann’s Pinot Blanc came in last, as the wine’s good nose alone was not enough to save a mouth that lacked those levels of acidity and tastiness that would be desirable to effectively counterbalance its smoothness and make it interesting.

Below you can find my detailed reviews of the three wines and decide for yourselves.

1. Third PlaceAlbert Mann, Pinot Blanc Alsace AOC, 2013 ($18) 

Albert Mann, Pinot Blanc Alsace AOC (Image courtesy of Snooth.com - click on image to go to website)

Albert Mann, Pinot Blanc Alsace AOC (Image courtesy of Snooth.com – click on image to go to website)

Albert Mann is an Alsatian winery that manages a 21 HA/52 acre estate which hosts five Alsace Grand Cru wines (i.e., Schlossberg, Furstentum, Hengst, Steinbrugler and Pfersigberg – for more information about the Alsace Grand Cru AOC, please refer to our previous post about Alsace). The winery applies organic and biodynamic methods to grape growing.

The wine that I reviewed was made out of 100% Pinot Blanc grapes grown according to biodynamic agriculture methods at Albert Mann’s Kientzheim and Wettolsheim vineyards on marl limestone soils. The average age of the grapevines is 25 years. The must was fermented in stainless steel vats. The wine was 12.5% ABV.

The Bottom Line: A good nose with aromas of peach, Mirabelle plum, yellow flowers and mineral notes (flint). In the mouth it feels off-dry and very smooth but in my view with not enough acidity to effectively balance its smoothness and make it interesting. The flavors are coherent with the aromatic profile and reminiscent of peach and Mirabelle plum, with slight mineral hints. Overall: a good nose but a mouthfeel that is not on par with its bouquet. Fairly Good Fairly Good – $

Our Detailed Review: In the glass, it poured straw yellow and moderately viscous. The nose was moderately intense, moderately complex and fine, with aromas of peach, Mirabelle plum, yellow flowers and mineral notes (flint). In the mouth, it was off-dry, with medium ABV, smooth; scarcely acidic and moderately tasty. The wine was medium-bodied and slightly off-balance, with intense and fine flavors of peach and Mirabelle plum, along with slight mineral hints. The finish was medium and the wine’s evolutionary state was mature, meaning drink now.

2. The Runner UpDomaines Schlumberger, Pinot Blanc “Les Princes Abbés” Alsace AOC, 2013 ($17)

Domaines Schlumberger, Pinot Blanc  "Les Princes Abbés" Alsace AOC (Image courtesy of Domaines Schlumberger)

Domaines Schlumberger, Pinot Blanc “Les Princes Abbés” Alsace AOC (Image courtesy of Domaines Schlumberger)

Domaines Schlumberger manages an over 121 HA/300 acre estate in Guebwiller and is the largest Grand Cru producer in Alsace.

The wine that I reviewed was a blend of 70% Auxerrois and 30% Pinot Blanc which was left to mature on its lees for seven months following fermentation. The wine was 13.5% ABV.

The Bottom Line: It starts with a very timid nose, with a rather faint and narrow aromatic profile of apple and citrus. When you taste it, however, it switches gears and offers a pleasant mouthfeel with decent acidity and good sapidity that make it refreshing as well as nice, citrusy flavors intertwined with interesting mineral and saline notes. Overall: good minus, saved by its mouth. Good- Good / $

Our Detailed Review: In the glass, it poured straw yellow with golden reflections and viscous. The nose was scarcely intense, scarcely complex and fair, with aromas of apple and citrus. In the mouth, it was dry, with medium ABV, smooth; moderately acidic and tasty. The wine was medium-bodied and balanced, with intense and fine flavors of citrus, along with mineral and saline notes. The finish was medium and the wine’s evolutionary state was mature, meaning drink now.

3. The WinnerMeyer-Fonné, Pinot Blanc “Vieilles Vignes” Alsace AOC, 2013 ($19)

The Meyer-Fonné estate was founded way back, in 1732. The winery does not use synthetic fertilizers, herbicides or pesticides to treat its grapevines.

Meyer-Fonné, Pinot Blanc "Vieilles Vignes" Alsace AOC (Image courtesy of Meyer-Fonné)

Meyer-Fonné, Pinot Blanc “Vieilles Vignes” Alsace AOC (Image courtesy of Meyer-Fonné)

The wine that I reviewed was a blend of 65% Auxerrois, 20% Pinot Blanc and 15% Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir. The grapes were grown in a 6-acre vineyard on 40 to 50 year old vines and were hand-picked at harvest time. After pneumatic pressing of the grapes, the must fermented in stainless steel vats and oak barrels for a period of one to three months using natural yeast, after which it matured on its lees until bottling. The wine was 12.5% ABV.

The Bottom Line:  A rather restrained but nice nose with aromas of citrus, yellow peach, lemon blossoms, almond and a mineral note (graphite?) In the mouth it is definitely pleasant: bone dry, smooth and very tasty, with flavors of citrus and yellow peach along with noticeable mineral and iodine notes, which make the wine almost saline. Overall: very pleasant and perfect for Spring and Summer parties or relaxing evenings out on the patio. Good to Very Good Good to Very Good – $

Our Detailed Review: In the glass, it poured golden yellow and moderately viscous. The nose was moderately intensemoderately complex and fine, with aromas of citrus, yellow peach, lemon blossoms, almond and a mineral note (graphite?) In the mouth, it was dry, with medium ABV, smooth; moderately acidic and tasty. The wine was medium-bodied and balanced, with intense and fine flavors of citrus and yellow peach along with noticeable mineral and iodine notes, making the wine almost saline. The finish was medium and the wine’s evolutionary state was mature, meaning drink now.

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About Stefano

I am a photographer and an ISA certified sommelier. I contribute to two blogs, Flora's Table (the fine cooking and wine blog - www.florastable.com) and Clicks & Corks (my photography and wine blog - www.clicksandcorks.com). My photography Web site is at www.LightQuill.com
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6 Responses to Wine Review: Three 2013 Alsatian Pinot Blancs… Or Should I Say One and a Half?

  1. Stefano says:

    Reblogged this on Clicks & Corks and commented:

    After last week’s post introducing France’s Alsace wine region and the Alsace AOC appellation, it is time to move on to the actual reviews and tasting notes of three Pinot Blancs from Alsace that you may want to bear in mind for your Spring/Summer wine shopping list: check them out on Flora’s Table!

  2. Mary Frances says:

    Mmm, love the recommendations. Perfect for Spring. I’ll have to try some pairings soon.

  3. Wow Stefano – it really does seem like trickery to be able to label them all as Pinot Blanc, even if there’s absolutely NO Pinot Blanc within… crazy! Interesting though that your preferred wine was the blended one, instead of the 100% PB. Any chance they relaxed the rules because of less than desirable results with the 100% PBs? Great post!

  4. Like you Stefano, I like when wines of Alsace. If I was asked for my favourite white varietal I would probably plump, off the top of my head, for Riesling. And I love drinking examples of it from different parts of the world, although in the main I prefer to drink red wine. I have seldom tasted Pinot Blanc so it is good to read your review. It seems mad not to mention misleading to label a wine Piont Blanc when it’s not! 😉

  5. I tasted my first Alsace Pinot Blanc last week. It was the 2012 vintage of Domaines Schlumberger Les Princes Abbes. It was very nice. I also had the opportunity to taste their Pinot Gris Grand Cru Spieger and Grand Cru Saering Riesling; both were outstanding! I love all things Alsace!!

  6. Dina says:

    Great reading and tasty one too, Stefano. That’s a fine credit being asked to review the three Pinots! 🙂 Well done. From Bonn is only a few hours to Alsace and I have been there many times enjoying the excellent wines and food.
    Wishing you all a lovely, sunny long weekend
    Dina & co Xx

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