Tag Archives: Sauvignon Blanc

Wine Review: St. Michael-Eppan, AA Sauvignon "Sanct Valentin" DOC 2013

St. Michael-Eppan, Alto Adige Sauvignon "Sanct Valentin" DOC Image courtesy of St. Michael-Eppan

St. Michael-Eppan, AA Sauvignon “Sanct Valentin” DOC
Image courtesy of St. Michael-Eppan

With Valentine’s Day fast approaching, there is just no other wine that comes to mind than St. Michael-Eppan, Alto Adige Sauvignon “Sanct Valentin” DOC 2013 ($34)¬†ūüėČ So, that is the wine that we are going to review today.

Happy Valentine’s Day, y’all! ūüėČ

The Bottom Line

Overall, the Sauvignon Sanct Valentin was very good: it had an expressive bouquet with tertiary aromas well under control (thanks to its being aged mostly in stainless steel) and a great, coherent mouthfeel, where its high ABV and gentle smoothness were perfectly balanced by its intense sapidity and zippy acidity.

Rating: Very Good and Recommended¬†Very Good¬†‚Äď $$

(Explanation of our Rating and Pricing Systems)

About the Grape Variety and the Appellation

Sauvignon Blanc is a white-berried grape variety originating from France.

Recent DNA analysis has identified a parent-offspring relationship between Savagnin (an old white-berried variety that is common in the Jura region of France) and Sauvignon Blanc and, there being much earlier documents mentioning Savagnin than Sauvignon Blanc, the former is believed to be the parent of the latter.

DNA results also support the thesis that, contrary to common belief, Sauvignon Blanc did not originate from the Bordeaux area, but rather from the Loire Valley in France, where documental evidence dates back to 1534 (compared to 1710 in Bordeaux).

However, it is interesting to note that, when Sauvignon Blanc was grown in the Bordeaux area, it spontaneously crossed with Cabernet Franc to create Cabernet Sauvignon.

In New Zealand, Sauvignon Blanc was first planted in the 1970s and soon became the most widely grown variety in the country, especially in the Marlborough region.

(Information on the grape variety taken from Wine Grapes, by Robinson-Harding-Vouillamoz, Allen Lane 2012 ‚Äď for more information about grape varieties, check out our Grape Variety Archive)

About the Producer and the Estate

St. Michael-Eppan is a cooperative winery that was founded in 1907 by 41 grapevine growers in the Eppan (AKA, Appiano) area, in the north-east Italian region of Alto Adige, and has by now expanded to encompass 340 farmers.

Out of the more than 1,000¬†HA of vineyards in the Eppan area, St. Michael-Eppan¬†manages 380 HA where both white-berried varieties (Pinot Blanc, Chardonnay, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, M√ľller-Thurgau, Silvaner and Gewurztraminer)¬†and black-berried varieties (Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Lagrein and Schiava) are grown.

The composition of the soils where St. Michael-Eppan’s vineyards are located is a mix of glacial moraine debris, limestone gravel and alluvial soils.

The Sankt Valentin vineyard, which sources the grapes for St. Michael-Eppan’s premium “Sanct Valentin” line,¬†measures 18 HA and is located at 1,800-2,035 ft (550-620 mt) above sea level on limestone gravel soils in the Eppan Berg area.

Our Detailed Review

The wine that we are going to review today is St. Michael-Eppan, Alto Adige Sauvignon “Sanct Valentin” DOC 2013.¬†As discussed, ‚ÄúSanct Valentin‚ÄĚ is the flagship line in St Michael-Eppan’s wine offering. The Sauvignon Sanct Valentin is available in the US where it retails at about $34.

The Sauvignon Sanct Valentin 2013 is a whopping 14.5% ABV and is made from 100% Sauvignon Blanc grapes harvested from 10 to 28 year-old vines at an elevation of about 1,970 ft (600 mt) above sea level in proximity to the town of Eppan/Appiano (in the Bolzano district). 90% of the wine is fermented in stainless steel vats and then aged for about 6 months on its lees, with the remaining 10% being fermented and aged in wood casks.

As usual, for my reviews I will use a simplified version of the ISA wine tasting protocol that we described in a previous post: should you have doubts as to any of the terms used below please refer to that post for a refresher. For your own structured wine tastings, consider downloading our FsT Wine Tasting Chart!

In the glass, the wine was straw yellow and viscous.

On the nose, its bouquet was intense, complex and fine, with pleasant aromas of nettle, lime, grapefruit, herbaceous notes, boxwood, a touch of butter and mineral hints.

In the mouth, the wine was dry, with high ABV, smooth; acidic and tasty. It was full-bodied and balanced, with intense and fine mouth flavors of grapefruit, lime and mineral notes. Its finish was long and its evolutionary state was ready (i.e., wonderful to enjoy now, but it might become even better and more complex if it rests two or three more years in your cellar).

Frittata Primavera – Recommended Wine Pairing

Cantina Terlano, Alto Adige Terlano Sauvignon "Quarz" DOCWell, it has been quite a while since our last food pairing post, so time to catch up on things…

Today we will pair Francesca’s frittata¬†primavera with a proper wine.

As we did in the past, we will base our choice on the ISA wine paring criteria: should you have missed my post about them, you may refer to it to get a better idea of what these are.

We will therefore start by identifying the main qualities of the food we want to pair a wine with, which in the case of the frittata are: latent sweetness, fatness, some greasiness and latent acidity due to the use of tomatoes; also, we can classify Francesca’s frittata as a dish with medium structure.

St. Michael Eppan, Alto Adige Sauvignon "Sanct Valentin" DOCAs we know, using the ISA wine pairing criteria, these qualities are going to dictate the corresponding characteristics that we want our wine to possess, which are (in the same orider as above): good acidity, tastiness/minerality, decent ABV and smoothness, plus the wine we seek should be medium-bodied or thereabouts.

In light of these desired characteristics, our choice has fallen on a Sauvignon Blanc. In an effort to spread the knowledge that Italy also produces quality wines from international varieties, we will focus our recommendations on a few Italian 100% Sauvignon Blancs that are definitely worth trying out, if you have a chance:

Cantina Terlano, Alto Adige Terlano Sauvignon “Quarz” DOC, a delicious wine that ages for 9 months on its lees (partly in steel vats and partly in wood barrels) and boasts a pleasing bouquet of citrus, Granny Smith apple, exotic fruit, herbs and minerals

Vie di Romans, Friuli Isonzo Rive Alte Sauvignon "Piere" DOCSt. Michael Eppan, Alto Adige Sauvignon “Sanct Valentin” DOC, a very good wine from the winery’s flagship “Sanct Valentin” line, that ages for 6 months on its lees (88% in steel vats and 12% in wood barrels) and has fine aromas of citrus, grapefruit, white flowers, herbs and iodine notes

Vie di Romans, Friuli Isonzo Rive Alte Sauvignon “Piere” DOC, a wonderful Sauvignon Blanc made of grapes harvested from a vineyard with an excellent density of 6,000 vines/HA that ages for 7 months on its lees in steel vats and seduces the senses with a captivating bouquet of lemon, tangerine, sage, almond and minerals

Manincor, Alto Adige Sauvignon “Lieben Aich” DOC, a very interesting wine that undergoes spontaneous fermentation through the use of natural yeasts, ages on its lees for ten months in oak barrels and has elegant aromas of citrus, exotic fruit, herbs, white flowers and minerals

Manincor, Alto Adige Sauvignon "Lieben Aich" DOCVilla Russiz, Collio Sauvignon “De La Tour” DOC, an elegant wine that ages¬†for 7 months on its lees in steel vats and¬†possesses a complex bouquet of apple, kiwi, white flowers, citrus, herbs and iodine notes.

Enjoy, and as always, if you happen to try out any of these wines,  let me know how you like them!

A Visit to the Greenwich Wine+Food Festival and CTbites Blogger Lounge

Greenwich, CT: The CTbites Blogger Lounge at the Greenwich Wine+Food Festival, with Executive Editor Amy interviewing a guest

Last weekend Francesca and I had been kindly invited to visit the Greenwich 2013 Wine+Food Festival by Amy, the energetic Executive Editor of CTbites.

CTbites is (in their own words) “a web-based community built by and for people who love food in Connecticut“. It was founded in 2009 by Stephanie Webster, CTbites’ Editor in Chief, and it now includes Executive Editor Amy Kundrat, a dozen contributors and thousands of enthusiastic eaters who mostly gravitate in or around Fairfield County, Connecticut.

CTbites’ editors and contributors aim to scout and share with readers new food-related¬†operations (from restaurants to food stores and farmer’s markets) as well as to try and review every restaurant, diner and dive in Fairfield County for their readers’ benefit.

Unfortunately, Francesca could not make it to the Festival due to an event she had to participate in at our daughter’s school, so I “had to” step up to the plate and go visit the Festival by myself. ūüėČ

The Festival took place at Roger Sherman Baldwin Park in Greenwich, CT, a beautiful recreational space overlooking Long Island Sound, and featured more than 130 food or wine exhibitors, most of whom had stands in the large Culinary Village Tent, which was the epicenter of the Festival, while the others were scattered in a few satellite tents focusing on specific themes or showcasing kitchen appliances.

Greenwich, CT: The Maserati tent at the Greenwich Wine+Food Festival

There were however two additional prominent features: one was a local Maserati dealership’s tent, sporting two brand new sports cars, and the other was the CTbites Blogger Lounge: a tent right by the entrance of the Festival where food and wine bloggers could congregate, attend a program featuring interviews of a number of prominent chefs and of course meet the wonderful people behind CTbites.

In this regard, I had the opportunity to talk to Amy and Stephanie and they are both great РI would add unsurprisingly, considering how much they have achieved in a relatively short period of time. As an added bonus, the CTbites Blogger Lounge offered its visitors excellent, creamy espresso (and being Italian, if I say excellent, I think you should trust me!) provided by Espresso NEAT Cafe in Darien, CT. Make sure to check them out if you are in the area.

Greenwich, CT: The CTbites Blogger Lounge at the Greenwich Wine+Food Festival

During my visit, beside of course hanging out in the Blogger Lounge and checking out the Maserati’s ūüėČ I browsed the main tent, mostly focusing on (I bet you guessed) wine. While of course the Festival was mainly a food event and one that mostly targeted consumers (in other words, it was no Vinitaly International or Gambero Rosso’s Tre Bicchieri NYC), there were still a few interesting wine tasting opportunities. These are, in a nutshell, those that struck me the most:

Nantucket Vineyard: I had been interested in checking them out for a while, primarily because I love the island. ūüôā The winery was founded in 1981 on Nantucket by Dean and Melissa Long and nowadays it sources most of the grapes they use for making their wines from Yacama Valley in Washington State. I had the opportunity to taste their Chardonnay, which was quite pleasing: lean, citrus-y with hints of grapefruit and only slightly oaked (it ages one year in French oak), which for me is a definite plus. All in all, an easy to drink, refreshing Chardonnay. I also tasted their Sailor’s Delight, a Merlot and Syrah¬†blend that¬†ages for 18 months in French oak. This wine didn’t quite work for me, as I found it quite thin and bland, with red fruit aromas and an acidic edge that in my view threw it a little bit off balance.

USA, Greenwich: The stand of the Nantucket Vineyard, a US wine producer, at the Greenwich Wine + Food Festival

WineWise: this is a wine store that just recently opened in Greenwich¬†and features a whole array of wines, from entry-level ones to top wines that they hold in a dedicated space known as “the vault”. Among other wines, I had the opportunity to taste a very pleasant Martinez Lacuesta Rioja Gran Reserva 2004, with a nice nose of leather, cocoa and cherry, and a nicely balanced structure. The wine¬†retails for $37, which in my view is a bit on the high side for a wine that sure is good, but is in a price range that offers several very solid alternatives to compete with.

USA, Greenwich: WineWise, a Greenwich wine store at the Greenwich Wine + Food Festival

Quintessential Wines: This importer and distributor showcased a selection of wines from their portfolio. I tasted a few, and the one that impressed me most was an organic Matetic Casablanca EQ “Coastal” Sauvignon Blanc 2012 from Chile: a great, typical nose for the variety, with intense aromas of grapefruit, citrus, “cat pee” (if you like Sauvignon Blanc, you most likely know what I am talking about) and nettle, with crisp citrus-y and mineral flavors, complemented by a lively acidity. Very pleasant, considering also its appealing $20 price point.

Greenwich, CT: The stand of TMRW, a Canadian icewine importer, at the Greenwich Wine+Food FestivalTMRW: This acronym stands for the quite cheesy name “The Most Romantic Wine“, a collection of VQA Canadian icewines made from selected wineries (Caroline Cellars, Cornerstone and King’s Court) and distributed by Icewines Exclusive.¬†The collection comprises a range of ten different alternatives, varying by grape variety and by originating winery. The wines come in half-bottle size (375 ml) and are made from grapes grown in Canada’s Niagara peninsula (in the province of Ontario) that are hand-harvested at night when the temperatures lower to 18F/-8C or below. I have been able to taste a few, including a Cabernet Sauvignon, a Cabernet Franc and a Vidal, but my personal favorite was the Caroline Cellars Riesling VQA Icewine 2008: liquid gold with intense aromas of peach, dried apricot, white flowers and a touch of tangerine, followed by sweet mouth flavors of dried apricot, pear and hints of honey, counterbalanced however by good acidity that kept the wine alive. To me, it has been a pleasant discovery.

Although there were many more interesting stands and exhibitors at the Festival, it is time to wrap things up: I enjoyed attending the Greenwich 2013 Wine+Food Festival as well as the opportunity to mingle with the CTbites team at their Blogger Lounge – thank you, Amy, for the kind invitation. If you live in or near Fairfield county, consider visiting the Festival next year and by all means if you are not familiar with CTbites yet, check them out online and consider signing up for their newsletter and invites to cool culinary happenings.

Disclaimer: CTbites kindly provided a pass to the Festival. The opinions about the Festival, the exhibitors and CTbites are solely my own.

Wine Review: Cloudy Bay, Sauvignon Blanc Marlborough 2012

Ever since fellow wine blogger and friend Oliver was kind enough to ask me to contribute a guest post to his excellent blog,¬†The Winegetter, I have been really excited about the idea. Since¬†the theme was “Somewhere Beyond the Sea”¬†and the post was going to be published in the summertime, I thought reviewing¬†one of my favorite New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs¬†(Cloudy Bay,¬†Sauvignon Blanc Marlborough 2012 – $30) would just be the way to go: definitely “somewhere beyond the sea” pretty much from anywhere you look at it (unless of course you are a Kiwi!) and a refreshing summer wine. So there we go – and of course: (i) you may find this post also in Oliver’s blog¬†and (ii) thank you so much, Oliver, for including me in your list of distinguished guest contributors – I feel honored and it has been a lot of fun!

The Bottom Line

Overall, I think that¬†Cloudy Bay is a¬†very pleasant Sauvignon Blanc¬†in the “Down Under” style: intense, concentrated fruit and herb aromas, lively acidity and citrus-centric flavors. So very refreshing and summery that I would keep drinking it all Summer long… if budget permitted! ¬†ūüėČ

Rating: Very Good and Recommended Very Good Р$$

(Explanation of our Rating and Pricing Systems)

About the Grape

A few interesting notions about the origins of Sauvignon Blanc: recent DNA analysis has identified a parent-offspring relationship between Savagnin (an old white-berried variety that is common in the Jura region of France) and Sauvignon Blanc and, there being much earlier documents mentioning Savagnin than Sauvignon Blanc, the former is believed to be the parent of the latter. DNA results also support the thesis that, contrary to common belief, Sauvignon Blanc did not originate from the Bordeaux area, but rather from the Loire Valley in France, where documental evidence dates back to 1534 (compared to 1710 in Bordeaux). However, it is interesting to note that, when Sauvignon Blanc was grown in the Bordeaux area, it spontaneously crossed with Cabernet Franc to create Cabernet Sauvignon.

In New Zealand, Sauvignon Blanc was first planted in the 1970s and soon became the most widely grown variety in the country, especially in the Marlborough region.

(Information on the grape varieties taken from Wine Grapes, by Robinson-Harding-Vouillamoz, Allen Lane 2012 Рfor more information about grape varieties, check out our Grape Variety Archive)

About the Estate

Cloudy Bay‘s vineyards¬†are located in different subzones of the premium wine region of¬†Marlborough¬†at the northern end of New Zealand’s South Island, alongside the¬†Wairau River. Cloudy Bay also sources part of the grapes used for making their wines from a few independent Wairau Valley growers with whom they have established a long-term business relationship.

Our Detailed Review

Let’s now get to the actual review of¬†Cloudy Bay,¬†Sauvignon Blanc Marlborough 2012, which in the US retails for about $30.

The wine has 13.5% ABV and was made from 100% Sauvignon Blanc grapes sourced from estate and grower vineyards located in the Rapaura, Fairhall, Renwick and Brancott subzones of the Wairau Valley. Fermentation was primarily carried out in stainless steel, except for a small percentage that was fermented in old French oak barriques.

As usual, for my review I will use a simplified version of the ISA wine tasting protocol that we described in a previous post: should you have doubts as to any of the terms used below please refer to that post for a refresher. For your own structured wine tastings, consider downloading our FsT Wine Tasting Chart!

In the glass, the wine poured crystal clear, a beautiful straw yellow in color, and viscous with narrow arches and slow dripping tears

On the nose, its bouquet was intense, complex and fine, with pleasant, Summer-y aromas of lime, grapefruit, citrus, green apple and herbs (nettle, mint)

In the mouth, it was dry, had medium ABV and was moderately smooth; it was freshly acidic and moderately tasty. The wine was medium-bodied and balanced, despite its freshness (i.e., acidity) being the dominating component Рbut that is in most cases a desirable feature in a dry white wine and in our case it also helped make the quite muscular ABV of the wine not so evident in the mouth, which is a good thing, so it did not change our assessment that the wine was balanced. Its mouth flavors were intense and fine, with pleasant, refreshing notes of lime, grapefruit, citrus and herbs. The wine had a medium finish and its evolutionary state was mature, meaning ready to be enjoyed now, with additional cellaring not likely to benefit the wine.